Hocus is a puzzle game about navigating Escher objects. The objective is to navigate a red cube to a red square on pathways of square beams that ignore the usual laws of space and perspective. The cube can only roll along surfaces that it's flush with meaning that most of the time is spent trying to get from the inside of a structure to the outside and vice versa. In practice this behaves like a maze but it's not in two or three dimensions but a strange mash up of the two. Parts that shouldn't be touching connect and block off other sections. Half of the game is wrapping your brain around the rules of Escher space and the other is simple path finding. Unsurprisingly, doing both at the same time is a bit of a challenge. I found myself repeatedly drawing paths that I should have known wouldn't work but that I was modeling as happening in normal space.

As if playing games in weird space wasn't bad enough it has a level builder so that you to can create abominations against Euclid to torment others with. Actually, it's really simple and really easy to use, you have to beat the level in order complete level creation so it's impossible to create an impossible level, and the levels are stored as a short string in plain text making it as portable as possible. Here is a super simple level I made in two minutes:

VVE/VlE0Wh0lXQYdUlYgTFAdSCoSEhkcAB4USw==

As far as super simple puzzle games go this is a slam dunk with easy to use mouse/touch screen controls, ninety-nine levels, and potentially infinite extensibility through community content. Steam page here

IRON NODER THE THIRTEENTH

Ho"cus (?), v. t. [See Hocus-pocus.]

1.

To deceive or cheat.

Halliwell.

2.

To adulterate; to drug; as, liquor is said to be hocused for the purpose of stupefying the drinker.

Dickens.

3.

To stupefy with drugged liquor.

Thackeray.

 

© Webster 1913.


Ho"cus, n.

1.

One who cheats or deceives.

South.

2.

Drugged liquor.

 

© Webster 1913.

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